Food Glorious Food…

Unique and quirky Siopa Gan Ainm –Shop With No Name – is located on the Coal Quay at number 3 Cornmarket St, Cork city. This farm shop and café is open from Wednesday to Saturday. It serves wholesome, honest-to-goodness local food. The shop sells fresh-farm vegetables, meats, free-range eggs, cheese, milk, jams and honey as well as being used in their dishes for breakfast, brunch, lunch and ‘high tea’. This is where I go when I need to go to the city. The chef starts the day by offering breakfast; there is something for everyone, whether you are in the mood for a hearty breakfast or a light bite of French pastries such as croissants. Drop in for your mid-morning coffee and scone. Lunchtime offers a daily dish-of-the-day alongside the usual menu. Pop in for afternoon tea with a slice homemade tart topped up with freshly whipped cream or a slice of cake; there is a great selection of ‘leaf’ teas. Here you will find all local produce, menus cater for vegetarians too. I usually enjoy the ‘veggie breakfast’ if I’m having an early lunch and I’m fortunate enough that it’s still being served at that time of the day – the best poached eggs, just as I prefer them otherwise my choice leans towards the ‘veggie toastie’.

Siopa Gan Ainm

There is a homely feel to the place. The owner and staff are friendly. Be aware that waiting times can be (but not always) a little long but please bear with them. Staff members are overseas students who want to improve their English. Once your plate is placed in front of you, you will not be sorry for the wait. Whether it’s the homemade soup or grilled sandwiches, the food is always tasty. The seating is colourful; tables are placed somewhat haphazardly as the place is small. Regulars have no problem sharing their table if needs be as it can get very busy; they enjoy a good banter. There is always someone to chat to; however, there are newspapers and books if you prefer to read. During the winter months there is a wood fire burning which brings a cosy atmosphere to the place. I enjoy having lunch there when I’m in town and usually indulge in some home baking afterwards. Drop in for a look and perhaps you’ll stop for a bite…

The shop is associated with the weekly Saturday Framers’ Market, also located on the Coal Quay. From 9 am stalls are erected; home-grown vegetables, homemade breads, goats’ milk and cheese, locally-grown apples, and plants and flowers. So much to choose from… during the summer season locals are delighted by the presence of Irish-grown summer fruits – strawberries, raspberries, blueberries – scrumptious. And, to top all that, pots of homemade jams are arranged alongside the wonderful-tasting fruits. We are fortunate enough to be an island nation and, therefore, fresh fish is easily available. All these family-run businesses are an inherent part of Cork’s cityscape.   

Atlantic Irish Mist

For me, a place can never be neutral; landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes…we are shaped by whatever ‘-scape’ surrounds and envelopes us. We come to mirror our environment so to speak.  Have you ever thought about ‘place’ in a profound and philosophical sense?

A rugged terrain appears to characterise its people as tough and hardy; never fearful of getting their hands dirty or their feet muddy.

Coastal in habitants tend to never take for granted the mysterious element that is the sea – calm or chaotic – it will always take its quota of lives.

Lament of a rugged landscape or calamitous sea can be read on the faces and bodies of those working the land or heading out into the vast ocean.

Have you ever felt the scent of the sea waft under your nostrils when you’re journeying through the coast? I’d like to hear about your experiences. ‘Tasting’ a place, literally and metaphorically, is about using our senses to imbue ourselves with the sense of place.

The coast and the sea are important to me. As I sit, I watch the grey clouds travel across ‘an already grey sky’, from the south-west, bringing with them rain from the Atlantic. As they sweep across the sky, Atlantic mist is forming, creating a curtain or rather a blind that closes down on the sea, and thus, shutting out the horizon.

The coast is busy with cargo ships ‘ebbing and flowing’ as the pilot boat transports the local maritime pilots to and from awaiting vessels, each containing specific freight. It’s amusing to guess the size of the boat, from where it came and its onward journey once it leaves the Port of Cork.

The curtain continues to sweep across the bay. I never tire of this view or any sea view for that matter. It is ever-changing; no two days are the same. The curtain draws back, the blind swings up; the clouds are a much lighter shade, yet still no sun in sight, but I don’t mind. That is the beauty of coastal Ireland.

By the way, if you get a chance to view an Irish TV programme called Creedon’s Atlas of Ireland, it is really worth watch. The presenter, John Creedon, explores the true meaning behind some of Ireland’s most unusual and famous place names; each episode is a journey of discovery as John surveys and strides across the island of Ireland for lost meanings in everyday place names. It’s a 3-part series on Sundays at 18h30 for one hour on RTÉ One. You can view it online: http://www.rte.ie/player. Check out my review…