Culture Night – Our Local Craft Makers

Culture Night started in 2006 as a rather small-scale event concentrated only in Dublin. This annual occurrence has become an important and all-encompassing public event across the island of Ireland. It celebrates culture, creativity and the arts. Special and exceptional activities are scheduled at participating locations and everything is available free of charge.

I would like to tell you about my experience of it here in Cork this year – September 20. There was a plethora of activity throughout the county and city, however, I spent time at the Cork County Hall where there was a fantastic craft fair organised by Cork Craft and Design. From 2:00 pm, craft makers from around the county were busy setting-up their stands. Table cloths of all colours and patterns embellished the stands. By 4:00 pm all makers were operational, ready and waiting. There was an astonishing amount of crafters selling their creations from ceramics, and wood to jewellery makers, from lace and knitwear to greeting cards as well as artists putting their creativity into giving new life to organic objects found in nature.

As I meandered around the foyer of the County Hall, I was drawn towards the array of crafted objects, neatly arranged, and so appealing to the eye. I paused at each one, contemplating the items that were imagined, created, and produced by resourceful and artistic individuals. I chatted with some of them; sensitive to the personal stories about what inspired them and continues to motivate them to embrace such an aspiring livelihood. It must be highlighted that creative activity is not easy and many craft makers are regularly challenged in their daily enterprise.

I would encourage anyone reading this post, no matter where you are in the world, to support local industries. These small businesses are often the heartbeat of our towns and villages and without them life in such places would dissolve. Next time you are invited to a wedding, or a birthday party, or perhaps you would like to treat yourself, think of all those craft makers and artists in your local area creating unique work that merit your support. Let’s help sustain our local communities.

If you have not yet participated in Culture Night, come along to experience it for yourself, it’s a great way to celebrate and promote culture through creativity. Check out: https://culturenight.ie/. Bring on 2020…

Sherkin Island: The Ancestral Home of the O’Driscoll Clan

Sherkin Island – Inis Ascain in Irish – just a ten minute ferry journey from the charming coastal village of Baltimore. Sherkin Island is where my father and his siblings grew up. Although my grandparents came from the mainland they moved to the island in to rear their family. Unfortunately I don’t get to visit Sherkin as often as I would like to but when I do it’s a day-long cultural and historical trip.

When my husband and I were living in Courtmacsherry, a quaint seaside village just ten minutes from Clonakilty, West Cork, we set off early one Saturday morning to Sherkin Island. The drive there is delightful; feeling the warmth of the morning sun through the windscreen is heavenly. Less than an hour later we arrive in Baltimore. With ample parking in the village we have no problem parking the car. As we stroll over to the pier the excitement is mounting, I shall be my spouse’s personal tour guide for the day; it’s his first time visiting the island, the ancestral home of the O’Driscoll clan. Backpack full of goodies in case we, or should I say I get hungry! And especially water, I’m never without a bottle of water in my bag!

The ferry is quickly filled, engine roaring, the course is steered across Roaring Water Bay… Ten minutes of seaspray on my face, I can feel the taste of the salt. There’s a sense of being ‘homeward bound’, a return to the source so to speak.

We arrive at the slipway, we disembark, the ruins of the Franciscan Friary , the ‘Abbey’ as it is known locally, is on the left as we commence our journey around the island. The Friary was established in 1460 by Fineen O’Driscoll, chieftain of the area at the time. There is a lot of history surrounding the O’Driscoll Clan and Dunalong Castle – Dún na Long – which is located on the east side of the island, overlooking the entrance to Baltimore Harbour. If you’d like more information I’d encourage you to visit https://sherkinisland.ie/.  

The Franciscan Friary, know as ‘The Abbey’

For those of you who prefer to travel by ‘taxi’ there’s usually a local with a tractor and trailer, which on a wet day is very welcoming indeed, direct transport to the Jolly Roger traditional Irish pub and restaurant, forget about the scenic route! We are indeed very fortunate with the weather; the sun gleams upon us. The day is off to a great start.

The island is home to many artists, from painters and photographers to writers and craft makers working with a myriad of materials such as silk and wood. Their work can be purchased at the Island Crafts Shop that is situated on Baltimore pier. Sherkin Island offers an interesting and unique experience through its BA in Visual Art programme (BAVA) http://bavasherkin.com/. It is a four-year honours degree course proposing a dynamic and creative education in an exceptional location; an opportunity – and what an opportunity – that combines studio practice workshops on the island with a range of online distance education technologies. The principal aim of the programme is to provide students with an advanced knowledge of the nature, role and potential of contemporary art. This BA programme is jointly developed with TU Dublin; for more information please click on the link hereafter: http://www.dit.ie/studyatdit/undergraduate/programmescourses/allcourses/visualartsherkinislanddt589.html

We happen upon Silver Strand on the north-west side of the island, splendid views of Cape Clear Island – Oileán Chléire in Irish – and the Atlantic Ocean; a perfect place for a swim followed by a picnic. This is a spectacular ‘playground’ for the islanders; it was the playground of my father’s and his siblings and what a playground! I close my eyes; I can hear their shrieks of laughter.

The ‘Playground’ of my father’s and his siblings

After a morning of walking, taking in the theatrical views, we head back to the east coast for a well-deserved bite to eat and a drink at the Jolly Roger. We have a couple of hours to spend peacefully before returning to the mainland. We have worked up an appetite! We sit facing the village and harbour of Baltimore; splendid views… come see for yourself.

We observe the arrival of the ferry and so we make our way towards the pier. It is early evening and we bid farewell to my ancestral home. What a day; we’ll return soon…

Map of Sherkin Island

Cotton Wool Clouds!

As I sit on the terrace at home it’s a delight to feel the warmth of the sun on my face; a warm breeze touches my skin like a feather cooling me down. Indeed it is one of those rare days when the breeze is a welcoming encounter.

I hear the sound of the ocean against the rocks and the cries of laughter that come floating in the wind from the beach below. The sound of the sea is soothing. While I love to travel, well, today I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else; Ireland is paradise when the sky is blue and ‘cotton-wool’ clouds populace the horizon.

Peace and tranquillity… such bliss. Umm, the bliss is short-lived! The mood is broken! The thundering sound of a plane overhead; I open my eyes and catch the Brittany Ferries on its southbound course… you all know where this story is heading… Ah! Where is that plane going? And what about the holiday makers in the ferry… My imagination is quick to deviate itself from the pleasures of sitting on my terrace to travelling…

Falling asleep in a faraway place, aware of the pleasures that tomorrow will bring, feelings of freedom exploring new places and people, days of discovery fill my imagination. Visiting a foreign city, or distant coastal places, there’s delight in creating narratives of my own as I stroll through the streets sharing my thoughts about art, culture and architecture with my husband. But don’t forget that the ordinary is rich and wonderful. Join the journey of discovering the mundane experiences of new places; Be-in-their-world.

Allowing my feet to take me to where they want to go. Going with the flow, following my instinct, detecting the places where locals go, immersing myself into mundane activities. But, I also very much like to go where the visitors go, checking out interesting spots that showcase the geography, history, and indeed art of the places I visit.  

 I must say that living on the coast entices me to appreciate city escapes; discovering the flurry of activity that city life brings knowing that I’ll return to my quiet haven.  

Weaving together the cultural fabric of places through food, wine, art, architecture, and other elements of distinctiveness that make these places what they are and the people who they are. Threads woven together creating narratives that endeavour to reveal the secrets of such locations. Places mean different things to different people. Sharing experiences can open up new ways of seeing the world around us; and in so doing, entice the visitor to create narratives of their own.

Travelling and writing experiences are, for me, intertwined. I observe the places where my feet take me, be-there; then my feet surrender to my hands. Such encounters, using all my senses, are transferred to the blank page; my hands take over, gliding along its smooth surface. Both pen and page unite to create and archive my memories.